Public Health is for Everyone An inclusive planning toolkit for public health professionals

PRINT

SEARCH RESULTS

  1 to 10 of 33   Next >  Last >> 

  SORT BY:

Special Needs Checklist: How Disability-Friendly is Your City?

  • Website
  • Posted on: 08.22.2018
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Resource Provided By:
Your Storage Finder
Abstract


The city you live in can have an enormous impact on your quality of life - especially if you have a disability. From wheelchair accessible sidewalks to employment options to the weather itself, there are a variety of characteristics that can determine whether your hometown is a good place to live.

 

 

RTC on Independent Living Produces Guide for Making Homes Visitable by Wheelchair Users

  • Document
  • Posted on: 08.15.2018
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Resource Provided By:
Research and Training Center on Independent Living
Abstract


All too often, people with mobility limitations are excluded from the party, gathering or social event because the host's home is not visitable. The Research and Training Center on Independent Living has produced "Making Homes Visitable: A Guide for Wheelchair Users and Hosts," a resource that provides information about how people can make their homes visitable by people with mobility limitations - and why it matters.

Planning Accessible Meetings and Events: A toolkit

  • Document
  • Posted on: 05.10.2018
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Resource Provided By:
American Bar Association
Abstract


This toolkit is intended to assist entities in planning meetings and events that are accessible to persons
with disabilities. It provides recommendations and checklists for all phases of a meeting or an event,
from choosing the venue to promotion, registration, presentations, materials, social events, meals,
and staff and volunteer training. Note, however, that it is impossible to anticipate every barrier that
might limit or preclude participation by a valued member. Moreover, because new ideas for improving
accessibility and new technologies continue to emerge, this toolkit should be viewed as a living
document that is meant to evolve.

Use Medicines Wisely - Large font version

  • Document
  • Posted on: 10.14.2016
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Abstract


Medicines can treat health problems and help you live a healthier life. When used incorrectly,
medicines can also cause serious health problems. Many of these problems can be prevented. Learn four (4) tips to avoid common medicine mistakes.

Use Medicines Wisely Printable (Refreshable braille)

  • Document
  • Posted on: 10.14.2016
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Abstract


You take medicines to help with health problems. Medicines can help you live a healthier life. You
have to be careful because medicines can also cause problems. There are four things you should
do to be safe.

Use Medicines Wisely (for Women with intellectual disabilities and self advocates)

  • Document
  • Posted on: 10.14.2016
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Abstract


You take medicines to help with health problems. Medicines can help you live a healthier life. You have to be careful because medicines can also cause problems. There are four things you should
do to be safe.

What Local Health Departments Should Know about the Population of People with Disabilities

  • Document
  • Posted on: 08.07.2015
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Resource Provided By:
National Association of County & City Health Officials (NACCHO)
Abstract


The National Association of County and City Health Officials' (NACCHO's) Health and Disability Program has been working with local health departments (LHDs) across the United States for several years to encourage the inclusion of people with disabilities in LHD programs, products, outreach, and services. In a recent national assessment of LHDs, NACCHO found that LHDs often misperceive what constitutes the population of people with disabilities.1 Some LHDs reported people with disabilities as those with developmental disabilities or physical disabilities, while others reported that Communities of Color or non-English speaking populations classify as members of the disability population, which is not the case. This fact sheet helps to clarify who people with disabilities are from a public health perspective and provides health-related information to LHDs about the members of this population.

Understanding Health and Health Promotion for People with ID

  • Website
  • Posted on: 07.23.2015
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Resource Provided By:
Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD)
Author(s):
Developed by: Karen Edwards MD MPH, Susan Havercamp PhD, Leslie J Cohen JD, and David O'Hara, PhD With Review and Input by: Jamie Perry MD MPH, Adriane K Griffen MPH MCHES, and George S Jesien PhD
Abstract


The cases of this module are designed for LEND and UCEDD trainees to learn more about the adult phase of the life course continuum of health and health care for people with developmental and intellectual disabilities.

Communication Skills

  • Website
  • Posted on: 07.23.2015
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Resource Provided By:
Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD)
Author(s):
Karen Edwards MD MPH, and Catherine Yankou MPH
Abstract


This module is designed to help LEND and UCEDD trainees increase knowledge and skills about communicating with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in the areas of: health care and wellness encounters with people with I/DD; universal design in written and electronic communication; language use to demonstrate respect; supporting self-determination in health; the use of technology to enable effective communication; communication with people with sensory challenges and language differences; and working with interpreters.

Hospital Community Benefits after the ACA: Addressing Social and Economic Factors that Shape Health

  • Document
  • Posted on: 03.04.2015
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Resource Provided By:
The Hilltop Institute
Author(s):
Gayle D. Nelson, Jessica S. Skopac, Carl H. Mueller, Teneil K. Wells, Cynthia L. Boddie-Willis
Abstract


The Hilltop Institute's Hospital Community Benefit Program is a central, objective resource for state and local decision makers who seek to ensure that tax exempt hospital community benefit activities are responsive to pressing community health needs.This brief is the ninth in the series, Hospital Community Benefits after the ACA. Earlier briefs address the requirements for tax exempt hospitals established by §9007 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and assessed federal and state approaches to community benefit regulation.