Public Health is for Everyone An inclusive planning toolkit for public health professionals

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The Changing Reality of Disabiltiy in America: 2020

  • Document
  • Posted on: 11.29.2020
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Author(s):
Allan R. Meyers Memorial Project
Abstract


This project started in January of 2020 when the world, and most especially the United States, was different. Our priority to analyze the changing reality of disability was born of a growing sense of concern that much of what people knew of disability in 1990 had not evolved or not evolved enough. Unless we know who's being left out we cannot create a world that minimizes the rising volume of functional limitation and support everyone to live self-directed lives.

The goal of this project is to spotlight issues for people too seldom considered as central to understanding disability in America. To summon awareness that can help to inform policy as we act to rebuild from the 2020 COVID 19 pandemic and the Black Lives Matter protests. The hope is to stimulate research with neglected populations to end doing harm and learn what works if we are to measure progress.

Guide to Interacting with Police for Individuals with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities

  • Document
  • Posted on: 11.29.2020
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Author(s):
University of Cincinnati Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCCEDD)
Abstract


People with intellectual, cognitive or developmental disabilities get involved as both victims and suspects/offenders with law enforcement and with the criminal justice system. Use this factsheet to discuss policing with individuals with disabilities.

A Clear Mask Resource Page

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  • Posted on: 11.29.2020
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Author(s):
Adaptive Design Association
Abstract


Traditional face masks interfere with lip reading and transmission of sign language "facial grammar," disrupting communication for people who are deaf or hard of hearing.  In fact, being unable to see facial expressions is a barrier to communication for many people: teachers, health professionals, performers, police, and more. Clear masks -- those with a transparent window in front -- are being sought by many. Nationwide, volunteer sewists have produced and donated thousands of cloth masks, easing the PPE crisis. Together, let's shift mask culture to clear.

Disability Etiquette: Tips On Interacting With People With Disabilities

  • Document
  • Posted on: 10.29.2020
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Author(s):
United Spinal Association
Abstract


The United States Census Bureau reports that approximately 56.7 million Americans have a disability. This booklet is for anyone—with or without a disability—who wants to interact more effectively with people with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 was conceived with the goal of integrating people with disabilities into all aspects of life, particularly the workplace and the marketplace. Sensitivity toward people with disabilities is not only in the spirit of the ADA, it makes good business sense.

Use this resource to help you expand your practice, better serve your customers or develop your audience. When supervisors and co-workers use disability etiquette, employees with disabilities feel more comfortable and work more productively. Practicing disability etiquette is an easy way to make people with disabilities feel welcome.

Effective Communication for Health Care Providers: A guide to caring for people with disabilities

  • Document
  • Posted on: 10.29.2020
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Author(s):
University of Delaware, Center for Disabilities Studies
Abstract


Disability can impact communication. Identifying a patient’s disability and its potential impact on effective communication is the first step in reducing the risk of miscommunication. The type of disability – whether intellectual, sensory, mobility or mental health – will help determine the kind of accommodation needed. Usually minor accommodations can be made to ensure effective communication. There are many options for auxiliary aids and services to ensure effective communication. Health care providers and their staff can develop skills and acquire tools that will allow them to successfully provide accommodations to patients with disabilities. This guide will provide information to help you communicate effectively with your patients with disabilities.

What is Police Violence? A Plain Language Booklet About Anti-Black Racism, Police Violence, and What You Can Do to Stop It

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  • Posted on: 10.29.2020
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Author(s):
Autism Self Advocacy Network, American Association of People with Disabilities, Green Mountain Self Advocates
Abstract


We are writing this booklet in June of 2020. Right now, there are protests all over the country about racism and police violence. We wrote this booklet in plain language so as many people as possible can understand the protests. There is a lot to know about racism and police violence. Racism is when people are treated unfairly because of their race. Anti-Black racism is when Black people are treated unfairly because they are Black. We can’t talk about everything in this short booklet. We will tell you where to learn more. And, we will work on more resources. This booklet is just to get you started. 

Including People with Disabilities in Emergency Preparedness Efforts

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  • Posted on: 10.27.2020
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Author(s):
The National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO)
Abstract


The National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) Health and Disability program offers technical assistance to local health departments to improve their capacity to develop emergency preparedness plans that are inclusive of people with disabilities. The program provides health departments with practical strategies and recommendations for successfully including people with disabilities in emergency planning and response efforts.

Based on NACCHO’s experience in providing this technical assistance to health departments, NACCHO developed five key recommendations that health departments should consider when planning to accommodate and address the needs of people with disabilities in emergencies or disasters.

Strategies for Successfully Including People with Disabilities in Health Department Programs, Plans, and Services

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  • Posted on: 10.27.2020
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Author(s):
The National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), The National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDD) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), The Arc of the United States (The Arc),
Abstract


The National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), with support from the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDD) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and The Arc of the United States (The Arc), promotes the inclusion and engagement of people with disabilities in planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs, products, and services. In 2013, NACCHO conducted key informant interviews with LHDs on the topic of inclusion for people with disabilities to better understand the capacity for inclusion among LHDs. NACCHO found that LHDs were interested in including people with disabilities but did not always have the tools, resources, or knowledge needed to begin. This guide highlights specific strategies and tools to help both local and state health departments include people with disabilities in public health programming and planning efforts.

Successful Communication with People with Disabilities

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  • Posted on: 10.27.2020
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Author(s):
Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities
Abstract


Federal law requires covered entities—like COVID-19 testing centers and other medical facilities—to ensure their staff communicate effectively with people with disabilities. There are many types of disabilities—some visible, some invisible—and each individual person has their own unique needs and preferences. The best thing to do is ask a person how you can support them during the testing process. Use this resource for tips and guidelines to help you communicate effectively.

Guidelines: How to Write about People with Disabilities

  • Document
  • Posted on: 10.27.2020
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Author(s):
The University of Kansas, Research & Training Center on Independent Living
Abstract


This documnet provides guidlines on how to effectively write about people with disabilities.