How to Make Your Blog Accessible to Blind Readers

link to resource: http://www.afb.org/info/programs-and-services/afb-consulting-services/afb-accessibility-resources/how-to-make-your-blog-accessible/1235#like_button
Intended Audience:
Public Health Professional who works on disability and health efforts
Public Health Professional who is new to disabilities
Abstract

Quick tips on how to make your bog accessible to people with disabilities.


Guide to Room-by-Room Repairs for Easy Accessibility for Disabled Loved Ones

link to resource: https://www.homeadvisor.com/r/home-accessibility-room-to-room-guide/
Intended Audience:
Abstract

From mobility issues to cognitive impairment, disabilities affect many people's lives, whether by living with or loving someone who is differently-abled.


Accessible Spaces: A Fragrance-Free Toolkit

link to resource: https://csw.ucla.edu/about/fragrance-free/
Intended Audience:
Abstract

Curious about why going fragrance-free is important? Want to make your space more accessible? This new toolkit makes the answers easy to find and provides helpful tips and resources.


How to Support Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

link to resource: https://www.accreditedschoolsonline.org/resources/support-students-with-autism/
Intended Audience:
Public Health Professional who works on disability and health efforts
Public Health Professional who is new to disabilities
Abstract

This guide discusses the unique difficulties autistic students face and how educators can respond to them. In addition, advice is provided from autism experts and resources to help families with an ASD child.


Special Needs Checklist: How Disability-Friendly is Your City?

link to resource: https://www.yourstoragefinder.com/special-needs-checklist-how-disability-friendly-is-your-city
Intended Audience:
Abstract

The city you live in can have an enormous impact on your quality of life - especially if you have a disability. From wheelchair accessible sidewalks to employment options to the weather itself, there are a variety of characteristics that can determine whether your hometown is a good place to live.

 

 


RTC on Independent Living Produces Guide for Making Homes Visitable by Wheelchair Users

link to resource: http://rtcil.org/making-homes-visitable-guide-wheelchair-users-and-hosts
Intended Audience:
Abstract

All too often, people with mobility limitations are excluded from the party, gathering or social event because the host's home is not visitable. The Research and Training Center on Independent Living has produced "Making Homes Visitable: A Guide for Wheelchair Users and Hosts," a resource that provides information about how people can make their homes visitable by people with mobility limitations - and why it matters.


Planning Accessible Meetings and Events: A toolkit

link to resource: https://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/administrative/mental_physical_disability/Accessible_Meetings_Toolkit.authcheckdam.pdf
Intended Audience:
Public Health Professional who works on disability and health efforts
Public Health Professional who is new to disabilities
Abstract

This toolkit is intended to assist entities in planning meetings and events that are accessible to persons
with disabilities. It provides recommendations and checklists for all phases of a meeting or an event,
from choosing the venue to promotion, registration, presentations, materials, social events, meals,
and staff and volunteer training. Note, however, that it is impossible to anticipate every barrier that
might limit or preclude participation by a valued member. Moreover, because new ideas for improving
accessibility and new technologies continue to emerge, this toolkit should be viewed as a living
document that is meant to evolve.


Use Medicines Wisely - Large font version

link to resource: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ForWomen/FreePublications/UCM415987.pdf
Intended Audience:
Public Health Professional who works on disability and health efforts
Public Health Professional who is new to disabilities
Abstract

Medicines can treat health problems and help you live a healthier life. When used incorrectly,
medicines can also cause serious health problems. Many of these problems can be prevented. Learn four (4) tips to avoid common medicine mistakes.


Use Medicines Wisely Printable (Refreshable braille)

link to resource: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ForWomen/FreePublications/UCM417938.pdf
Intended Audience:
Public Health Professional who works on disability and health efforts
Public Health Professional who is new to disabilities
Abstract

You take medicines to help with health problems. Medicines can help you live a healthier life. You
have to be careful because medicines can also cause problems. There are four things you should
do to be safe.


Use Medicines Wisely (for Women with intellectual disabilities and self advocates)

link to resource: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ForWomen/FreePublications/UCM417938.pdf
Intended Audience:
Public Health Professional who works on disability and health efforts
Public Health Professional who is new to disabilities
Abstract

You take medicines to help with health problems. Medicines can help you live a healthier life. You have to be careful because medicines can also cause problems. There are four things you should
do to be safe.


What Local Health Departments Should Know about the Population of People with Disabilities

link to resource: http://www.aucd.org/docs/phe/Fact%20Sheet_General%20Overview.pdf
Intended Audience:
Abstract

The National Association of County and City Health Officials' (NACCHO's) Health and Disability Program has been working with local health departments (LHDs) across the United States for several years to encourage the inclusion of people with disabilities in LHD programs, products, outreach, and services. In a recent national assessment of LHDs, NACCHO found that LHDs often misperceive what constitutes the population of people with disabilities.1 Some LHDs reported people with disabilities as those with developmental disabilities or physical disabilities, while others reported that Communities of Color or non-English speaking populations classify as members of the disability population, which is not the case. This fact sheet helps to clarify who people with disabilities are from a public health perspective and provides health-related information to LHDs about the members of this population.


Hospital Community Benefits after the ACA: Addressing Social and Economic Factors that Shape Health

link to resource: http://www.hilltopinstitute.org/publications/HospitalCommunityBenefitsAfterTheACA-ShapeHealthIssueBrief9-May2014.pdf
Author(s):
Gayle D. Nelson, Jessica S. Skopac, Carl H. Mueller, Teneil K. Wells, Cynthia L. Boddie-Willis
Intended Audience:
Abstract

The Hilltop Institute's Hospital Community Benefit Program is a central, objective resource for state and local decision makers who seek to ensure that tax exempt hospital community benefit activities are responsive to pressing community health needs.This brief is the ninth in the series, Hospital Community Benefits after the ACA. Earlier briefs address the requirements for tax exempt hospitals established by §9007 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and assessed federal and state approaches to community benefit regulation.


Top 5 things to consider when designing an accessible bathroom for wheelchair users.

link to resource: https://www.eastersealstech.com/2014/06/11/top-5-things-consider-designing-accessible-bathroom-wheelchair-users/
Intended Audience:
Abstract

There are currently at least 30 million Americans using wheelchairs and those numbers continue to increase as a large population of people with age related challenges look for ways to live independently in their homes.Bathroom safety is one of the number one concerns in making a home accessible because more than 2/3 of emergency room visits are due to bathroom falls.


Accessibility Guidelines for Recreation Facilities

link to resource: http://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/recreation-facilities/outdoor-developed-areas/final-guidelines-for-outdoor-developed-areas/single-file-version-of-rule?highlight=WyJhY2Nlc3NpYmlsaXR5IiwiZ3VpZGVsaW5lcyIsImZvciIsInJlY3JlYXRpb24iLCJm
Intended Audience:
Abstract

These guidelines from the U.S. Access Board serve as the basis for standards for new construction and alterations of recreation facilities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).


AUCD 2012 Hotel Accessibility Checklist

link to resource: http://www.aucd.org/docs/ncbddd/accessibility%20checklist-hotels%20AUCD.pdf
Intended Audience:
Abstract

This checklist provides guidance for determining whether a hotel has accessible grounds, paths, and amenities for guests with a variety of disabilities.  This checklist was adapted and modified by AUCD to be used for site selection of the 2012 Disability and Health Partners Meeting site hotel.


Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities

link to resource: http://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/buildings-and-sites/emergency-transportable-housing/proposed-guidelines?highlight=WyJhY2Nlc3NpYmlsaXR5IiwiZ3VpZGVsaW5lcyIsImZvciIsImJ1aWxkaW5ncyIsImFjY2Vzc2liaWxpdHkgZ3VpZGVsaW5lcyIsImFjY2Vzc2liaWx
Intended Audience:
Abstract

This webpage contains scoping and technical requirements for accessibility to buildings and facilities by individuals with disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. These scoping and technical requirements are to be applied during the design, construction, and alteration of buildings and facilities covered by titles II and III of the ADA to the extent required by regulations issued by Federal agencies, including the Department of Justice and the department of Transportation, under the ADA.


US Access Board

link to resource: http://www.access-board.gov
Intended Audience:
Abstract

The Access Board is an independent Federal agency devoted to accessibility for people with disabilities.  The Board develops and maintains design criteria for the built environment, transit vehicles, telecommunications equipment, and for electronic and information technology.  It also provides technical assistance and training on these requirements and on accessible design, and continues to enforce accessibility standards that cover federally funded facilities.


Removing Barriers to Health Clubs and Fitness Facilities: A Guide for Accomodating All Members, Including People with Disabilities and Older Adults

link to resource: http://fpg.unc.edu/sites/fpg.unc.edu/files/resources/other-resources/NCODH_RemovingBarriersToHealthClubs.pdf
Intended Audience:
Abstract

This guide suggests ways your fitness facility can go beyond the minimum requirements of the law and make your facility and services more appealing and accessible to more people. The illustrations and information in this book demonstrate how barriers in the physical environment can be removed and how exercise equipment and fitness programs can be designed to create a welcoming facility that will attract additional members.


Accessibility Guidelines for Play Areas

link to resource: http://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/recreation-facilities/background/regulatory-assesssment-for-play-areas/chapter-3-number-and-size-of-play-areas-affected?highlight=WyJwbGF5IiwiYXJlYXMiLCJwbGF5IGFyZWFzIl0=
Intended Audience:
Abstract

This guide is intended to help designers and operators in using the accessibility guidelines for play areas. These guidelines establish minimum accessibility requirements for newly constructed and altered play areas. This guide is not a collection of playground designs. Rather, it provides specifications for elements within a play area to create a general level of usability for children with disabilities. Emphasis is placed on ensuring that children with disabilities are generally able to access the diversity of components provided in a play area.


Checklists for Hotels and Motels

link to resource: http://www.afb.org/section.aspx?FolderID=3&SectionID=3&TopicID=136&DocumentID=531
Intended Audience:
Abstract

This checklist from the American Foundation for the Blind provides practical, cost-effective solutions concerning access to hotel services and facilities by your guests who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired, as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).


It's the 'Person First' Then the Disability

link to resource: http://www.pacer.org/parent/php/php-c31.pdf
Intended Audience:
Abstract

If you saw a person in a wheelchair unable to get up the stairs into a building, would you say "There is a handicapped person unable to find a ramp?" Or would you say "There is a person with a disability who is handicapped by an inaccessible building?" What is the proper way to speak to or about someone who has a disability?

This document provides suggestions on how to use Person First Language to communicate with and about people with disabilities.

 


Montana Mammography Directory

link to resource: http://mtdh.ruralinstitute.umt.edu/blog/?page_id=1235
Intended Audience:
Abstract

The 2011-2012 Montana Mammography Directory provides information on mammography service providers by city. Each entry includes contact information, hours of operation, standard and additional services available, and disability access information.


Removing Barriers: Planning Meetings that are Accessible to All Participants

link to resource: http://fpg.unc.edu/sites/fpg.unc.edu/files/resources/other-resources/NCODH_RemovingBarriersPlanningMeetings.pdf
Intended Audience:
Abstract

This publication highlights guidelines and strategies to help organizations make their meetings accessible and welcoming to people with disabilities. The guide focuses on small and last-minute meetings to make sure that a variety of participants are included in all aspects of organizational life.


Person First Language

link to resource: http://www.aucd.org/template/page.cfm?id=605
Intended Audience:
Abstract

This site provides suggestions of more respectful terms that may be used when referring to people who have disabilities.


ADA Checklist for New Lodging Facilities

link to resource: http://www.ada.gov/introchk.pdf
Intended Audience:
Abstract

The Checklist contains common ADA problems identified during surveys of lodging facilities and will help you to determine if these problems exist at your lodging facility.


Accessibility--it's more than just a ramp!

link to resource: http://www.ndcpd.org/health/archive/publications/Accessibility_Its%20More%20than%20Just%20a%20Ramp.pdf
Author(s):
North Dakota Disability and Health Project
Intended Audience:
Abstract

A guide for health care workers who plan and facilitate meetings & other health-related events.


Accessible Customer Service Practices for Hotel and Lodging Guests with Disabilities

link to resource: http://www.ada.gov/accesscust.htm
Intended Audience:
Abstract

The hospitality industry prides itself on giving its customers a warm welcome and providing outstanding service in pursuit of high guest retention and consumer satisfaction. By extending that same level of customer service to guests who have disabilities, hotels and lodging establishments can build a clientele in a growing, diverse market that remains as yet nearly untapped.


Accessible Print Materials

link to resource: http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/docs/dph/health-equity/accessible-print-materials.pdf
Intended Audience:
Abstract

Health messages should be designed for diverse audiences, including people with disabilities. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) in adherence with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires that members of the general public with disabilities have communication access that is equally effective as that provided to people without disabilities. The MDPH Healthy Aging/Health and Disability Unit has developed guidelines for accessible printed health communications. These guidelines contain MDPH policies, recommended standards, and suggested websites for accessible design and print information. Additional resources for alternative communication services are also included.


BHIP: A Behavioral-Health Information Program for Children and Adults with Disabilities ABUSE, NEGLECT, & EXPLOITATION

link to resource: http://flfcic.fmhi.usf.edu/docs/BHIP/BHIP_Abuse.pdf
Author(s):
Havercamp, S.M. & Veguilla, M. Florida Center for Inclusive Communities
Intended Audience:
Abstract

The FCIC has developed health and wellness brochures to provide individuals with developmental disabilities with important information about living a healthy life. All brochures are available to download as pdfs documents. This brochure provides information on how to protect yourself from abuse, neglect, and exploitation. 


Checklist for Readily Achievable Barrier Removal

link to resource: http://www.ada.gov/checkweb.htm
Intended Audience:
Abstract

Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act requires public accommodations to provide goods and services to people with disabilities on an equal basis with the rest of the general public. The goal is to afford every individual the opportunity to benefit from our country's businesses and services, and to afford our businesses and services the opportunity to benefit from the patronage of all Americans.


Communicating With and About People with Disabilities

link to resource: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/disabilityandhealth/pdf/DisabilityPoster_Photos.pdf
Intended Audience:
Abstract

This fact sheet describes person first language and communicating with people with disabilities.


Community Action Guide

link to resource: http://www.aucd.org/resources/webinar_detail.cfm?event=2771&parent=740
Author(s):
Charles Drum, Marilyn Berndinelli, Patty Pickett-Cooper, Gloria Krahn, Willi Horner-Johnson, Brian Ritaco, Pania Wasfi
Intended Audience:
Abstract

The Community Action Guide outlines the principle underlying community engagement and strategies for successful engagement. It's a practical hands-on guide that includes step-by-step descriptions of the community engagement process, checklists for conducting successful events, toos for assessing the access in a given community. examples of how the community Engagement Initiative process has been applied.


Disability in Practice Webinar on Work with Tribes/Native Americans

link to resource: http://www.aucd.org/resources/webinar_detail.cfm?event=2771&parent=740
State Collaborator(s):
New Mexico, Arizona, Amputee Coalition, Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation, North Dakota
Intended Audience:
Abstract

This webinar provides examples of how public health programs have impacted health outcomes for tribes/Native Americans. Presenters shared specific examples from their programs, and participated in an interactive question and answer session on this issue.


Electronic Tool Kit of Training Resources for Medical, Dental, and Nursing Students

link to resource: http://www.aucd.org/template/news.cfm?news_id=3194&parent=295&parent_title=AUCD Publications&url=/template/page.cfm?id%3D295
Intended Audience:
Public Health Professional who works on disability and health efforts
Public Health Professional who is new to disabilities
Abstract

In response to the Surgeon General's A Call to Action to Improve the Health and Wellness of Persons with Disabilities, the U.S. Office on Disability, in collaboration with the Department of Labor Office on Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), initiated a National Work Group to ensure that medical, nursing and dental students receive training in providing high quality care to patients with disabilities.

As part of this work, AUCD and the Training Directors Council are pleased to host the Electronic Tool Kit of pre-service curricular materials, directed to the needs of patients with disabilities, for use by medical, nursing and dental schools. Whenever possible, we have indicated where effectiveness studies have been conducted for each tool.

This tool kit has direct links, whenever possible, to web-based materials, and contact information for obtaining materials available in other formats (e.g., DVDs, etc.). The five topical areas are by intended audiences:

  • Medical students/residents
  • Dental students
  • Nursing students
  • Interdisciplinary (applicable across two or more of the above disciplines)
  • Other (general knowledge about developmental disabilities, family-centered care, etc.)

 


Section 508.gov Opening Doors to IT

link to resource: http://www.section508.gov/
Intended Audience:
Abstract

Resources for understanding and implementing Section 508


Wheelchair Gardening Tips

link to resource: https://learn.eartheasy.com/articles/wheelchair-gardening-tips/
Intended Audience:
Abstract

Getting out into nature can be difficult for people with mobility challenges, as most hiking trails and many gardens are not designed for wheelchairs, walkers, scooters or similar mobility assistance devices. The simple pleasures which gardening offers can have added value for those with limited access to nature.


Accessible Rights of Way: Planning and Designing for Alterations

link to resource: http://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/buildings-and-sites/about-the-ada-standards/background/adaag?highlight=WyJhY2Nlc3NpYmxlIiwicmlnaHRzIiwib2YiLCJ3YXkiLCJhY2Nlc3NpYmxlIHJpZ2h0cyIsImFjY2Vzc2libGUgcmlnaHRzIG9mIiwicmlnaHRzIG9mIiwicmlnaH
Intended Audience:
Abstract

This technical assistance webpage has been developed to provide guidance in the planning and design of pedestrian improvements constructed as part of an alteration project. Its text, illustrations, and case studies aim to expand the reader's body of knowledge in accessible right-of-way design.