Public Health is for Everyone An inclusive planning toolkit for public health professionals

PRINT

ALL RESOURCES

Complete list of resources: 333 resources Email All results Print All results
  1 to 10 of 333   Next >  Last >> 

  SORT BY:

Accessible Lodging

  • Document
  • Posted on: 07.08.2020
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Author(s):
Content was developed by the Mid-Atlantic ADA Center and the Northwest ADA Center, and is based on professional consensus of ADA experts and the ADA National Network.
Abstract


The Department of Justice (DOJ) has issued revised ADA regulations under Title III, which covers many types of private businesses, or “places of public accommodation.” Many of these revisions apply to places of lodging, such as new requirements for reservation systems, and revised standards for facility access.

Americans with Disabilities Act National Network 

Accessible Lodging - Spanish Version

  • Document
  • Posted on: 07.08.2020
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Author(s):
Content was developed by the Mid-Atlantic ADA Center and the Northwest ADA Center, and is based on professional consensus of ADA experts and the ADA National Network.
Abstract


El Departamento de Justicia (DOJ, por sus siglas en inglés) ha emitido regulaciones revisadas de la ADA bajo el Título III, que cubren muchos tipos de empresas privadas o “lugares de alojamientos públicos”. Muchas de estas revisiones se aplican a lugares de alojamiento, tales como los nuevos requisitos para los sistemas de reserva y normas revisadas sobre el acceso a instalaciones.

Americans with Disabilities Act National Network 

Reccomendations for Requesting at-home COVID-19 Laboratory Tests

  • Document
  • Posted on: 07.08.2020
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Author(s):
The Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDH)
Abstract


There are people in Puerto Rico who, because of a disability, the state of their health, or because they are taking care of a person who requires supervision or has a disability, cannot physically go to a clinical laboratory to get tested for COVID-19. Because of the close contact for supervising and supporting the daily tasks of these populations, it is difficult for these families to implement the appropriate isolation at home. For this reason, we recommend performing the test at home through the services of a clinical laboratory. It is also crucial that a doctor provides the order or referral for taking the sample for the COVID-19 test of all the household members who live with the person with disabilities.

This document outlines a number of recommendations in order to facilitate the implementation of at-home COVID-19 laboratort tests.

 

Guidance for Direct Sevice Providers

  • Website
  • Posted on: 07.08.2020
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Author(s):
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Abstract


Direct Service Providers (DSPs) include personal care attendants, direct support professionals, paraprofessionals, therapists, and others. They provide a wide variety of home and community-based, health-related services that support people with disabilities. Services provided may include personal care, activities of daily living, access to health services, and more. DSPs should follow everyday prevention actions when working with clients without suspected or confirmed COVID-19, and healthcare provider guidance for standard and transmission-based precautions when providing care for clients with COVID-19. Risk of infection with COVID-19 is higher for people providing direct care (such as DSPs and household members) for someone known to have COVID-19 because of their close contact with the infected person.

This website includes information on DSPs and COVID-19 and how to protect yourself and the people you work with.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Guidance for Group Homes for Individuals with Disabilities

  • Website
  • Posted on: 07.08.2020
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Author(s):
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Abstract


Group homes (GHs) for people with disabilitiesexternal icon can vary in size from small to larger congregate settings. In congregate living settings, several factors may facilitate the introduction and spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.See this website for considerations and strategies for GH administrators to encourage behaviors that reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Guidance for Direct Service Providers, Caregivers, Parents, and People with Developmental and Behavioral Disorders

  • Website
  • Posted on: 07.08.2020
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Author(s):
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Abstract


People with developmental and behavioral disorders may live in group homes or interact with Direct Service Providers (DSPs). CDC has provided guidance for group homes and DSPs who provide assistance to people with disabilities. Many of the recommendations for COVID-19 preparation and response described in those guidance documents also apply to caregivers and DSPs for people with developmental and behavioral disorders.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Understanding COVID-19 for Individuals with Developmental and Behavioral Disorders

  • Website
  • Posted on: 07.08.2020
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Author(s):
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Abstract


Developmental and behavioral disorders are a group of conditions due to an impairment in physical, learning, language, or behavior areas. These conditions begin during the developmental period, may affect day-to-day functioning, and usually last throughout a person’s lifetime.Most people with developmental or behavioral disorders are not naturally at higher risk for becoming infected with or having severe illness from novel coronavirus (COVID-19). However, people with developmental or behavioral disorders who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at risk of serious illness.

This website includes information on how to protect yourself and others from COVID-19  and understanding or practicing preventative measures, and communicating symptoms of illness.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

COVID-19 Communication Rights Toolkit

  • Website
  • Posted on: 07.08.2020
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Author(s):
CommunicationFIRST
Abstract


Patients with the coronavirus who need communication tools and supports due to speech-related disabilities face greater risks of discrimination and isolation during this pandemic. Your legal and civil rights to access your communication supports do not go away during an emergency, in quarantine, or in the hospital! But, for safety reasons, your family members and others who help you communicate may not be allowed to join you in the hospital. And you may face other barriers to communicating your needs and desires while you are being treated. 

This toolkit: (1) explains your communication rights; (2) provides tips on advocating for them, and (3) has an accommodation request form you can bring to the hospital.

CommunicationFIRST

Is Your Hospital Visitor Policy Discriminatory

  • Website
  • Posted on: 07.08.2020
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Author(s):
CommunicationFIRST
Abstract


"We have received multiple calls from around the country about overly restrictive hospital "no-visitor" policies. These policies often allow visitors for patients without disabilities, including infants, children, women giving birth, and those at the end of life, but prevent access to the support people necessary for patients with disabilities. These policies discriminate against patients who require communication and other disability-related supports that hospital staff simply are unable to provide—a significant portion of CommunicationFIRST's population."

CommunicationFIRST

ADA Compliance with Visitations in Healthcare Facilities: Coronavirus Pandemic Guidance for Advocates

  • Document
  • Posted on: 07.08.2020
COLLAPSE DETAILSEXPAND DETAILS
Author(s):
June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant
Abstract


This guide offers tips for disability rights activistis advocating for visitations and working with healthcare facilities and state governments during the current pandemic crisis about how to ensure healthcare facilities comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant