Public Health is for Everyone An inclusive planning toolkit for public health professionals

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Cultural and Linguistic Competence Checklist for Medical Home Teams

  • Document
  • Posted on: 11.15.2018
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Resource Provided By:
National Center for Cultural Competence
Abstract


This checklist is not intended to measure the cultural and linguistic competence of any given medical home team. Rather, it is designed to provide a structure for discussion and self-examination. It is also designed to facilitate the programmatic and organizational change necessary to respond effectively to culturally defined beliefs, practices, and preferences and the inherent issues they raise in the provision of health care and related services for youth and their families.

Roots of Health Inequity Facilitator Guide

  • Document
  • Posted on: 10.22.2018
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Resource Provided By:
National Association of County & City Health Officials (NACCHO)
Abstract


The Roots of Health Inequity online curriculum
is designed for people to participate in groups,
which allows the rich discussions necessary for
getting to the root of health inequities.

Special Needs Checklist: How Disability-Friendly is Your City?

  • Website
  • Posted on: 08.22.2018
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Resource Provided By:
Your Storage Finder
Abstract


The city you live in can have an enormous impact on your quality of life - especially if you have a disability. From wheelchair accessible sidewalks to employment options to the weather itself, there are a variety of characteristics that can determine whether your hometown is a good place to live.

 

 

RTC on Independent Living Produces Guide for Making Homes Visitable by Wheelchair Users

  • Document
  • Posted on: 08.15.2018
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Resource Provided By:
Research and Training Center on Independent Living
Abstract


All too often, people with mobility limitations are excluded from the party, gathering or social event because the host's home is not visitable. The Research and Training Center on Independent Living has produced "Making Homes Visitable: A Guide for Wheelchair Users and Hosts," a resource that provides information about how people can make their homes visitable by people with mobility limitations - and why it matters.

Regional Disability Integration Specialists

  • Document
  • Posted on: 06.12.2018
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Resource Provided By:
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
Abstract


Current list of Regional Disability Integration Specialists

Managing traumatic stress- After the hurricanes

  • Website
  • Posted on: 06.06.2018
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Resource Provided By:
American Psychological Association (APA)
Abstract


It is common for people to experience very strong emotional reactions with the arrival of a hurricane and its accompanying damage to homes and community infrastructures. If you are experiencing distress in the wake of the recent hurricanes, you are not alone. Understanding common responses to extreme events can help you to cope effectively with your feelings, thoughts, and behaviors. Putting into practice some of the tips in this guide can help you along the path to managing the storm's aftermath and feeling better.

How to emotionally prepare for a hurricane

  • Website
  • Posted on: 06.06.2018
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Resource Provided By:
American Psychological Association (APA)
Abstract


Here are some simple and effective ways to manage your storm-related fears and anxiety. Many are essential ingredients for a healthy lifestyle and adopting them can help improve your overall emotional and physical well-being

Hurricane Opens Trauma Wounds

  • Document
  • Posted on: 06.06.2018
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Resource Provided By:
Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma
Abstract


Re-traumatization is the opening of old emotional wounds and the anxious anticipation of such re-wounding. It may be worse that the original trauma because it implies a string of "bad luck"-a sense of endless travail rather than one bad episode that has come and gone. It often feels like the old trauma plus a new trauma plus a loss of psychological safety. Psychological safety may be a myth (the thought that everything will eventually turn out right) but it is a helpful myth. 

Parent Guidelines for Helping Children after a Hurricane

  • Document
  • Posted on: 06.06.2018
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Resource Provided By:
The National Child Traumatic Stress Network
Abstract


This document offers parents guidance on helping their children after a hurricane. This fact sheet describes common reactions children may have after a hurricane, what to do to help, and self-care tips for parents.

Inclusive Emergency Management Preparedness, Response, and Recovery White Paper

  • Document
  • Posted on: 05.31.2018
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Resource Provided By:
Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD)
Abstract


This white paper provides summarizes key learnings from recent disasters impacting specific Territories and policy recommendations for University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service (UCEDDs), as well as government leaders at the Federal, State and Territorial levels.