Public Health is for Everyone An inclusive planning toolkit for public health professionals

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What Local Health Departments Should Know about the Population of People with Disabilities

  • Document
  • Posted on: 08.07.2015
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Resource Provided By:
National Association of County & City Health Officials (NACCHO)
Abstract


The National Association of County and City Health Officials' (NACCHO's) Health and Disability Program has been working with local health departments (LHDs) across the United States for several years to encourage the inclusion of people with disabilities in LHD programs, products, outreach, and services. In a recent national assessment of LHDs, NACCHO found that LHDs often misperceive what constitutes the population of people with disabilities.1 Some LHDs reported people with disabilities as those with developmental disabilities or physical disabilities, while others reported that Communities of Color or non-English speaking populations classify as members of the disability population, which is not the case. This fact sheet helps to clarify who people with disabilities are from a public health perspective and provides health-related information to LHDs about the members of this population.

Hospital Community Benefits after the ACA: Addressing Social and Economic Factors that Shape Health

  • Document
  • Posted on: 03.04.2015
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Resource Provided By:
The Hilltop Institute
Author(s):
Gayle D. Nelson, Jessica S. Skopac, Carl H. Mueller, Teneil K. Wells, Cynthia L. Boddie-Willis
Abstract


The Hilltop Institute's Hospital Community Benefit Program is a central, objective resource for state and local decision makers who seek to ensure that tax exempt hospital community benefit activities are responsive to pressing community health needs.This brief is the ninth in the series, Hospital Community Benefits after the ACA. Earlier briefs address the requirements for tax exempt hospitals established by §9007 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and assessed federal and state approaches to community benefit regulation.

Top 5 things to consider when designing an accessible bathroom for wheelchair users.

  • Website
  • Posted on: 07.11.2014
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Resource Provided By:
Easter Seals Crossroads
Abstract


There are currently at least 30 million Americans using wheelchairs and those numbers continue to increase as a large population of people with age related challenges look for ways to live independently in their homes.Bathroom safety is one of the number one concerns in making a home accessible because more than 2/3 of emergency room visits are due to bathroom falls.

Accessibility Guidelines for Recreation Facilities

  • Website
  • Posted on: 09.26.2013
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Resource Provided By:
US Access Board
Abstract


These guidelines from the U.S. Access Board serve as the basis for standards for new construction and alterations of recreation facilities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

AUCD 2012 Hotel Accessibility Checklist

  • Document
  • Posted on: 05.24.2012
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Resource Provided By:
Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD)
Abstract


This checklist provides guidance for determining whether a hotel has accessible grounds, paths, and amenities for guests with a variety of disabilities.  This checklist was adapted and modified by AUCD to be used for site selection of the 2012 Disability and Health Partners Meeting site hotel.

Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities

  • Website
  • Posted on: 05.24.2012
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Resource Provided By:
US Access Board
Abstract


This webpage contains scoping and technical requirements for accessibility to buildings and facilities by individuals with disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. These scoping and technical requirements are to be applied during the design, construction, and alteration of buildings and facilities covered by titles II and III of the ADA to the extent required by regulations issued by Federal agencies, including the Department of Justice and the department of Transportation, under the ADA.

US Access Board

  • Website
  • Posted on: 05.24.2012
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Resource Provided By:
US Access Board
Abstract


The Access Board is an independent Federal agency devoted to accessibility for people with disabilities.  The Board develops and maintains design criteria for the built environment, transit vehicles, telecommunications equipment, and for electronic and information technology.  It also provides technical assistance and training on these requirements and on accessible design, and continues to enforce accessibility standards that cover federally funded facilities.

Removing Barriers to Health Clubs and Fitness Facilities: A Guide for Accomodating All Members, Including People with Disabilities and Older Adults

  • Document
  • Posted on: 05.24.2012
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Resource Provided By:
North Carolina Office on Disability and Health
Abstract


This guide suggests ways your fitness facility can go beyond the minimum requirements of the law and make your facility and services more appealing and accessible to more people. The illustrations and information in this book demonstrate how barriers in the physical environment can be removed and how exercise equipment and fitness programs can be designed to create a welcoming facility that will attract additional members.

Accessibility Guidelines for Play Areas

  • Website
  • Posted on: 05.24.2012
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Resource Provided By:
US Access Board
Abstract


This guide is intended to help designers and operators in using the accessibility guidelines for play areas. These guidelines establish minimum accessibility requirements for newly constructed and altered play areas. This guide is not a collection of playground designs. Rather, it provides specifications for elements within a play area to create a general level of usability for children with disabilities. Emphasis is placed on ensuring that children with disabilities are generally able to access the diversity of components provided in a play area.

Checklists for Hotels and Motels

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  • Posted on: 05.24.2012
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Resource Provided By:
American Foundation for the Blind
Abstract


This checklist from the American Foundation for the Blind provides practical, cost-effective solutions concerning access to hotel services and facilities by your guests who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired, as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).